ABOUT ME

About Saira Khan, PsychD, HCPC registered

If you’re here, you’re ready to start the road to the healing and self-love you deserve. 

Getting help isn’t easy, especially when you’re a survivor of abuse. I want to be a source of healing and growth for you as you work through the difficulties of surviving an abusive relationship.

I know firsthand the struggle of healing because I was in your shoes at one point. It took years for me to even realize that I was experiencing coercive control and was in an abusive relationship.

My personal experience of abuse and recovery is why I do what I do. That’s why I’m passionate about supporting people who are trying to overcome the aftermath of coercive control.

Before opening my private practice in the UK, I worked in women’s organisations with survivors of abuse and for trauma recovery services in the NHS. This work and my personal journey informs my psychological practice.  

I witnessed people go through a transformative, healing process through our time together while coping with tremendous pain. That’s when I decided that helping others heal after abuse would be the main focus of my practice. Now I’ve helped many people rebuild their lives and find a renewed sense of self after enduring this type of abusive relationship.

So, I know there is hope for you.

You should be the leader of your own life.

I have worked in mental health for over 15 years. I have studied trauma recovery from the evidence base in psychology over the course of my doctorate and continue to build on this knowledge. I’m well-equipped to help you move towards recovery.


Abusive relationships impact the mental health of individuals in far-reaching and intrusive ways. There's often more going on than you may realize. I have a firsthand appreciation for that impact as both a survivor and a psychologist. Unfortunately, not every therapist understands the true nature of coercive control. But I’m working to change that through research and advocating for how therapists can effectively help survivors of this type of abuse.


It’s time to end victim-blaming and re-traumatization for people recovering from abusive relationships – and instead, help survivors move forward and heal.

In order not to re-traumatize you in therapy, it’s important to work from a trauma-informed framework.


In Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), you’ll learn how your thoughts, emotions, and behaviours affect one another. Together we’ll find the right tools and coping skills for when you feel overwhelmed. These coping skills will help you manage those thoughts and feelings – not feeling good enough, being put down all the time, and constantly being under the control of someone else. We’ll tackle all these difficult thoughts and emotions together.


My approach is holistic and based on the belief that as a survivor you are recovering from trauma. I also follow the relational feminist model, which is something I cherished when working with community and women’s organisations. This therapeutic framework is geared towards creating connections and finding healing and acknowledging oppression in the family and in society.


My overarching goal is to create a welcoming, warm space where we can rebuild your sense of self together. From my personal experience, I know how crucial it is to establish open and honest communication..


Seeking help for my own experience after abuse was not easy. Since coercive control is so invasive and your abuser makes you feel like all your problems are your fault – it’s especially difficult to take that first step towards recovery. This is why I’m the perfect person to help you because I know what it’s like to seek therapy after experiencing abuse

Finding hope as a survivor of an abusive relationship is the cornerstone to your recovery. The first step is believing that there is a way out, and life will get better.


What happens after you leave that relationship?

How do you navigate the world and other relationships that follow?

What allows you to build trust with another human being after an abusive relationship?


You are not alone. There is hope for healing and recovery. With the right support, you will find a way to forge a new path. 


I have worked in mental health for over 15 years. I have studied trauma recovery from the evidence base in psychology over the course of my doctorate and continue to build on this knowledge. I’m well-equipped to help you move towards recovery.

Abusive relationships impact the mental health of individuals in far-reaching and intrusive ways. There’s often more going on than you may realize. I have a firsthand appreciation for that impact as both a survivor and a psychologist. Unfortunately, not every therapist understands the true nature of coercive control. But I’m working to change that through research and advocating for how therapists can effectively help survivors of this type of abuse.

It’s time to end victim-blaming and re-traumatization for people recovering from abusive relationships – and instead, help survivors move forward and heal.

In order not to re-traumatize you in therapy, it’s important to work from a trauma-informed framework.

In Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), you’ll learn how your thoughts, emotions, and behaviours affect one another. Together we’ll find the right tools and coping skills for when you feel overwhelmed. These coping skills will help you manage those thoughts and feelings – not feeling good enough, being put down all the time, and constantly being under the control of someone else. We’ll tackle all these difficult thoughts and emotions together.

My approach is holistic and based on the belief that as a survivor you are recovering from trauma. I also follow the relational feminist model, which is something I cherished when working with community and women’s organisations. This therapeutic framework is geared towards creating connections and finding healing and acknowledging oppression in the family and in society.

My overarching goal is to create a welcoming, warm space where we can rebuild your sense of self together. From my personal experience, I know how crucial it is to establish open and honest communication..

Seeking help for my own experience after abuse was not easy. Since coercive control is so invasive and your abuser makes you feel like all your problems are your fault – it’s especially difficult to take that first step towards recovery. This is why I’m the perfect person to help you because I know what it’s like to seek therapy after experiencing abuse

Finding hope as a survivor of an abusive relationship is the cornerstone to your recovery. The first step is believing that there is a way out, and life will get better.

What happens after you leave that relationship?

How do you navigate the world and other relationships that follow?

What allows you to build trust with another human being after an abusive relationship?

You are not alone. There is hope for healing and recovery. With the right support, you will find a way to forge a new path. 

Want To Learn More About How We Can Work Together?

If you’re ready to begin your journey towards healing from coercive control and an abusive relationship, book a free call. I promise to be open, honest, and understanding of your situation. You’ll be treated with respect and care. I look forward to speaking with you!